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Posts tagged ‘Report’

New NCoC Report: Latinos Civic Health Index (2015)

In the 1980’s, Latinos were described as America’s sleeping giant.

Latinos Civic Health IndexOver these decades, Latinos have gradually increased their civic aptitude and today are influencing the country’s civic life. With the release of the National Conference on Citizenship’s (NCOC) Latinos Civic Health Indexwe now have an in-depth understanding of Latino civic engagement across a wide range of indicators.

The report finds that Latino youth are at the forefront of increasing civic engagement within their communities. While overall Latino civic participation rates are lower than the rest of the population, improved educational opportunities, English language proficiency, and a higher than average rate of social media usage create increased avenues for youth engagement.

Two particularly interesting findings are that young Latino Internet users use social networking sites at higher rates (80%) than non-Latino whites (70%) and African Americans (75%).  Additionally, lower income Latino youth are more likely than their higher income Latino counterparts to use social media.  Combined, these points offer new opportunities for civic organizations and governments to focus on social media as a way to increase engagement.

The report, which is available in English and Spanish, can be found here.

FREE PUBLICATION | AAC&U’s Civic Prompts—Making Civic Learning Routine across the Disciplines

By Rebecca Keller, AASCU Civic Engagement Intern and Indiana University of Pennsylvania

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AASCU’s sister organization AAC&U has produced a free publication entitled Civic Prompts: Making Civic Learning Routine across the Disciplines. This report suggests a need to 1) change the definition/current conception of civic learning, 2) more clearly articulate precisely what a “civic minded” institution is, and 3) ensure that all educators are capable of engaging their field of study through a civic lens. The report also advocates engaging students in the “big question” of civic learning; preparing students to not only have knowledge of civic engagement but to also actually take action; and highlighting personal and social responsibilities in every discipline.

Download your free copy of Civic Prompts here (pdf).

Partner Spotlight: New Data & Report from CIRCLE

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Does the Age of a Presidential Candidate Matter to Young Voters?

As more contenders enter the next presidential race, CIRCLE continues looking ahead to 2016 and exploring the role that youth will play in that election. With candidates ranging in age from 43 (Marco Rubio) to 73 (Bernie Sanders) already among the declared aspirants, we explored an oft-asked question: do young people prefer to vote for younger candidates?

The answer is, largely, no. In 2008, less than 20% of young voters (ages 18-29) said that age was an important factor, and very few reported that it was “the single most important factor” in deciding their vote: only 6% of young Democrats and 4% of Republicans. While youth have voted for the younger of the presidential candidates in a majority of recent elections, those younger candidates have also generally been Democrats, which means the age of candidates is tied to other factors.

Read more.

America’s Civic Renewal Movement: Implications for Youth Engagement

Last month, Tisch College—the home of CIRCLE—released “America’s Civic Renewal Movement: The View from Organizational Leaders,” a report by former CIRCLE Director Peter Levine and Eric Liu, founder and CEO of Citizen University. The report is the product of interviews with 20 leaders from large, national civic engagement organizations who discussed the state of the field and broader strategies for civic renewal.

While the interviews did not focus on youth, its findings are highly relevant to youth engagement. Young people are developing their civic identities when there is not yet a robust network for civic renewal, and several interviewees lamented the lack of youth in formal settings, such as facilitating conversations.

Read more.

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