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Posts tagged ‘Civic Health’

New NCoC Report: Latinos Civic Health Index (2015)

In the 1980’s, Latinos were described as America’s sleeping giant.

Latinos Civic Health IndexOver these decades, Latinos have gradually increased their civic aptitude and today are influencing the country’s civic life. With the release of the National Conference on Citizenship’s (NCOC) Latinos Civic Health Indexwe now have an in-depth understanding of Latino civic engagement across a wide range of indicators.

The report finds that Latino youth are at the forefront of increasing civic engagement within their communities. While overall Latino civic participation rates are lower than the rest of the population, improved educational opportunities, English language proficiency, and a higher than average rate of social media usage create increased avenues for youth engagement.

Two particularly interesting findings are that young Latino Internet users use social networking sites at higher rates (80%) than non-Latino whites (70%) and African Americans (75%).  Additionally, lower income Latino youth are more likely than their higher income Latino counterparts to use social media.  Combined, these points offer new opportunities for civic organizations and governments to focus on social media as a way to increase engagement.

The report, which is available in English and Spanish, can be found here.

Volunteering and Civic Life in America data

The National Conference on Citizenship (NCoC), in partnership with the Corporation for National and Community Service, and the U.S. Census Bureau, recently released new Volunteering and Civic Life in America (VCLA) data for 2013.

While some key indicators remain high, 16 of the 20 civic health indicators dropped compared to our most recent data collected in 2011 and 2012. Below are some of the central findings:

  • Confidence in corporations increased with 64.5% reporting they have some or a great deal of confidence, up 2.5 points from 62% in 2011.
  • 25.4% or 62 million Americans volunteered a total of 7.7 billion hours compared to 26.5% in 2012.
  • 55.8% of Americans trust most or all of the people in their neighborhood and 12.1% of Americans exchanged favors for neighbors frequently. Both decreased by .9 and 1.9 points respectively since 2011.
  • More than a third of Americans (36.3%) are involved in a school, civic, recreational, religious, or other organization, down 3 points from 2011.
  • Americans who hear from family or friends frequently saw the third biggest drop at 3.3 points since 2011.
  • Americans reporting that they had some or a great deal of confidence in the media had the biggest drop of 7 points from 62% to 55%.

Overall, the data shows Americans continue to volunteer and engage in their communities at high rates. While the data is only from two years, we should be vigilant about the challenges facing America’s civc health.

To overcome these challenges, we must all redouble our efforts in our personal and professional lives. At NCoC, we are building the Service Year exchange (SYx) to unite Americans through service and supporting our partners through the Civic Health Initiative. Learn more about these efforts and join us. Together, we can strengthen civic life in America.

#ADPFF 9.27.2013

By Stephanie South, Program Associate, AASCU

Hello and happy #ADPFF, ADP peeps!

We didn’t post last week (sigh…) because ADP National Manager Jen Domagal-Goldman and I were at the 2013 National Conference on Citizenship at the United States Institute of Peace.

United States Institute of Peace

We were here: the United States Institute of Peace

So, this Friday, we are bringing you a couple pics and some of our favorite/thought-provoking tweets from the event. For more on what went down, discover #NCoC on Twitter.

ADP National Manager @ NCoC

ADP National Manager Jen Domagal-Goldman speaking about ADP at the 2013 NCoC

Some of the tweets/conversation-starters we favorited:

TweetTweet2Tweet1Half-Mast Flag

The flag at half-mast outside of the State Department as a show of respect for the victims of Navy Yard; NCoC also opened both days of the event with a moment of silence


Challenge Yourself: Use Civic Data to Meet Community Needs

by the National Conference on Citizenship (an ADP Partner organization)

Civic Data Challenge logoThe 2013 Civic Data Challenge launches today at the Data Visualization Summit in San Francisco. The Challenge invites participants to turn raw data about civic health into useful applications and visualizations that have direct impact on public decision-making.

Expanded version of last year’s challenge

Last year, the National Conference on Citizenship (NCoC) with the support of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation  launched the first-ever national Civic Data Challenge. Winning teams spanned the country and included undergraduate students and nonprofit leaders, financial analysts and graphic designers, developers and coders. They brought new eyes, new minds, and new skill sets to the field of civic health to help make this trove of community insight more valuable and accessible to decision makers and the public. For a great recap of last year’s Challenge, read Fast Company’s Visualizing Civic Data to Make the Case for Civic Health.

This year, NCoC, with the support of Knight Foundation, is launching an expanded version of the Challenge. Exciting additions to this year’s Challenge include:

  • Three Challenge phases–ideation, creation, and implementation– to help teams come together to build entries that are responsive to community needs.
  • Grand prizes to teams that create exceptionally useful products AND work with community partners to successfully implement those tools.
  • The opportunity for participants to improve entries along the way with the support of a team of expert advisors.

Submit an idea now

The Civic Data Challenge is asking community leaders, government officials, developers, coders and all interested citizens to get involved. The first step is to submit an idea through the Challenge website, from April 11 – May 19. This ideation phase is an opportunity to creative a collective brainstorm about what tools (apps, websites, videos, and infographics) could be built using civic data. These ideas will inform the parameters of the Challenge and teams will begin building entries to respond May 24 – July 28.  Join us at .

The Civic Data Challenge is supported by our launch partners at Innovation Enterprise who are organizing the Data Visualization Summit. DVSF is the world’s largest executive led data visualization summit and will be attended by Fortune 500 executives. The challenge is also supported by promotional partners at CEOs for Cities, DataKind, Data Visualization Summit and sponsors at


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