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Posts from the ‘Partners and Friends’ Category

What We’re Reading: New Partnerships Journal Issue

Partnerships: A Journal of Service-Learning and Civic Engagement

Read the latest edition of Partnerships: A Journal of Service-Learning and Civic Engagement, North Carolina Campus Compact’s peer-reviewed, online journal, hosted by the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

This spring 2017 issue of Partnerships offers new perspectives and research on enduring matters for service-learning scholars and practitioners.  Three articles tackle distinct areas of concern: co-curricular service to complement academic service-learning; international service-learning, and, curriculum development using a cross-sector team that does not adhere to traditional hierarchies. In addition, three book reviews confront the “why” of our engaged work even as we regularly strive to disseminate the best possible practices within engaged scholarship.

The journal is available online here.

Articles:

  • Creating Intentional Paths to Citizenship: An Analysis of Participation in Student Organizations (Julianne Gassman, Jennifer M. Beck, Jonathan Klein)
  • Developing Compassionate and Socially Responsible Global Citizens through Interdisciplinary, International Service-Learning (Sara Fry, Aileen Hale, Kelli Soll, Christopher Bower, Adiya Jaffari)
  • Bringing innovation theory to practice in a program model for collaborative knowledge building: The Curriculum Fellows Program (Laura Barbas-Rhoden, Beate Brunow, Sydnie Mick)

Book Reviews:

  • The political classroom: Evidence and ethics in democratic education (Vincent Russell)
  • Public participation for 21st century democracy (Jeanette Musselwhite)
  • Engaged research and practice: Higher education and the pursuit of the public good (Kathleen E. Edwards)

RIGHT TO THE CITY – CURTIS BAY: COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT THROUGH A MOBILE APP EXPLORATORY SESSION BY BUS

Right to the City – Curtis Bay: Community Engagement through a Mobile App Exploratory Session by Bus | Sponsored by Towson University

towson_logo.gifAnthropology students and faculty at Towson University along with the United Workers-Free Your Voice have been working on a participatory action research project with high-school students in environmental science classes to qualitatively study the environmental hazards in South Baltimore. Curtis Bay, Maryland is located in the southern portion of the City of Baltimore, Maryland. The neighborhood is located in a highly industrialized waterfront area in the southern part of the city and receives its name from the body of water to the east of which it sits. The area has had a toxic history.

Historic Sediments of Global Trade

During the 19th century, guano fertilizer from Peru was a prized commodity, particularly around the Chesapeake bay where both cotton and tobacco had drained the soil of its nutrients. Guano imports which migrated through and often remained in Curtis Bay initiated a long period of uneven disposal of hazardous and/or toxic materials in the soils, air, and bodies of residents.

Global Oil 

Prudential Oil Corporations in 1914 established a refinery in the middle of the Peninsula. Texas Oil Company of Delaware was established before the end of WWI. By the end of 1918, the Fairfield Peninsula was home to at least three petroleum product refineries and several fertilizer plants. Oil refining exposes the surrounding community to the risk of intense explosions while coal dust exacerbates lung and cardiovascular diseases.

Shipbuilding, Ship Breakdown in a Postindustrial wasteland

The Wartime efforts in the 1940s to manufacture materials needed to fortify American troops affected Curtis Bay. During this period, thousands of workers from WVA and elsewhere in Appalachia and African Americans migrated to Fairfield Peninsula for jobs in the shipbuilding and other emergent wartime industries. White workers received decent government subsidized housing while Blacks continued to be exiled to Old Fairfield only having access to substandard housing. The memories of expansive capitalism, exploitative laboring relations, race/class based discrimination, and toxicity do not simply linger as a historic artifact but rather continue to define how this landscape is viewed in Baltimore.

The Next Step in Curtis Bay’s Steady Decline into Toxicity

In 2009, Energy Answers announced it would build the nation’s largest trash-to-energy incinerator in Fairfield and presented the project as a solution to two crises: the waste crisis and the energy crisis. Energy Answers International promoted the project as a power plant providing schools and other facilities with “green energy.” The incinerator was originally slated to be sited less than a mile from Benjamin Franklin High School and Curtis Bay Elementary, which state environmental regulations wouldn’t have typically allowed (no incinerator can be built that close to a school). However, when the Public Service Commission approved the incinerator as an energy plant.*

Seize this opportunity to explore the Curtis Bay Area and the social justice work with Nicole Fabricant, Matthew Durington, and Samuel Collins, Ph.D.s, Associate Professors, Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice at Towson University along with the students and community agencies.

*For more on the Campaign to bring to an end the Trash to Energy Incinerator, See https://stoptheincinerator.wordpress.com/

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Applications Due May 26 for 2017 TWC Civic Engagement Award

Washington Center

The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars, an independent nonprofit educational organization, invites nominations for the 2017 Higher Education Civic Engagement Award.  The award will celebrate the power of partnerships by recognizing institutions demonstrating transformational civic leadership through strategic community partnerships.

In reviewing nominations, The Washington Center and the selection committee will consider the extent to which institutions are building strategic community partnerships that demonstrate the following:

  1. Leadership and innovation in defining and addressing issues of public concern at any level from the local to the global;
  2. Evidence of change that is systemic and sustainable;
  3. Depth and breadth of institutional commitment.

The Washington Center has presented the Higher Education Civic Engagement Awards each year since 2009.  Past awardees have reflected diverse institutional profiles.

Learn more about past recipients and how to nominate an institution here. The deadline for nominations is Friday, May 26th.

Five winners will receive one (1) full scholarship for a student to participate in The Washington Center’s Inside Washington 2018 academic seminar in January 2018.

Previous award recipients include a number of ADP institutions including:

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