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Examining Economic Inequality @SUNY Cortland

SUNY Cortland, one of 30 campuses participating in our ADP/TDC Economic Inequality Initiative, is launching a monthly series of lunchtime talks addressing issues of economic inequality beginning Tuesday, June 23.

Distinguished Service Professor of Sociology/Anthropology Craig Little will present “Pathways to Opportunity in Cortland County: A Presentation and Conversation” at noon in Room 203 of Main Street SUNY Cortland, located at 9 Main St. in downtown Cortland. His talk will focus on where Cortland County stands relative to other New York State counties in terms of inequality and opportunities for its citizens, especially young people.

The lunchtime series, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the SUNY Cortland Pathways to Opportunity Initiative group. The goal of the initiative is to bring together the area’s campus and community members to study the relationships between economic inequality, public policy, business opportunity, social mobility and civic engagement. Members discuss issues that include student loan debt, a livable hourly wage, and poverty.

Additional talks are slated for noon on select Tuesdays throughout the summer. Talks will continue to be scheduled monthly and updates will be provided.

For more information: http://www2.cortland.edu/news/detail.dot?id=19427bbd-2635-4240-b692-ac0963d9a588

What’s New with ADP? Summer 2015 Edition

by American Democracy Project on July 30, 2015

SAVE THE DATE

ANNOUNCEMENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE BLOG

What We’re Reading 

  • Wilderness and the Common Good-A New Ethic of Citizenship
    University of Wisconsin La Crosse political science faculty member Jo Arney has a new book out — Wilderness and the Common Good: A New Ethic of Citizenship (Fulcrum, 2015). Arney is one of the ADP faculty members leading our Stewardship of Public Lands 2015 faculty seminar as well as curating the emerging Stewardship of Public Lands AASCU National Blended Course. Read more here.
  • New Report on the Health of State Democracies
    The Center for American Progress (CAP) released a new report about the health of state democracies.  At a panel discussion in early July, Delegate Alfonso Lopez (D-VA), former state senator Nina Turner (D-OH), political/election law attorney Dara Lindenbaum, and Senator Richard Katz (R-ME) shared their thoughts about the topic with moderator Michele Jawando of CAP. Read more here.

#CLDE15 Meeting in Review: Leveraging Academic and Student Affairs Partnerships to Advance Civic Learning & Democratic Engagement
Our recent 2015 ADP/TDC/NASPA Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement (CLDE) Meeting in New Orleans, La. brought together a collection of faculty, students, administrators, community partners and representatives from our national sponsor and partner organizations committed to advancing civic learning and democratic engagement through higher education. Collectively, we considered one of higher education’s civic missions: to act as stewards of the communities they inhabit as well as to prepare students to be stewards of their present and future communities. Read more here.

Examining Economic Inequality at SUNY Cortland
In June, SUNY Cortland, one of 30 campuses participating in our ADP/TDC Economic Inequality Initiative, launched a monthly series of lunchtime talks addressing issues of economic inequality. The goal of the initiative is to bring together the area’s campus and community members to study the relationships between economic inequality, public policy, business opportunity, social mobility and civic engagement. Members discuss issues that include student loan debt, a livable hourly wage, and poverty. Read more here.

AASCU Policy Publication: Partnering for Prosperity
The American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) is pleased to present Partnering for Prosperity: Advancing the Institutional and State Agenda Through an Effective Collegiate State Relations Program. The report reflects AASCU’s longstanding efforts in fostering optimal state relations and state policy enabling America’s public colleges and universities to fully serve the public good. Read more here.

Partners & Friends

  • CIRCLE:

DATES FOR YOUR CALENDAR

August 1-6:  ADP’s 2015 Stewardship of Public Lands Faculty Seminar in Yellowstone
September 17:  Constitution Day
September 22:  National Voter Registration Day
November 3:  Election Day

Citizenship Under Siege Webinar Series – RSVP today

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Clashes Over Citizenship: Promoting, Listening, Learning, and Engagement

A Webinar Series of the Citizenship Under Siege Project

The U.S. Constitution’s preamble speaks of “We the People”—but who is considered part of that sacred circle, and how has this group varied over time? When national identity is hotly contested, what does it mean to experience citizenship as partial, denied, or fully acknowledged? How can the humanities illuminate differing narratives and open up space for understanding, connections, and shared visions of the future?

The Association of American Colleges and Universities and The Democracy Commitment invite faculty, staff, students, and campus community partners to join in one or all of three FREE webinars. These events are designed to expand campus expertise on how to hold constructive conversations about contentious issues and how to institute practices in and out of the classroom that foster engagement across differences.  Register TODAY and join us!

Tomorrow’s Webinar:
Webinar #1: From Fractious Differences to Engaged Dialogues 
October 13, 2016 | 3:00–4:00 p.m. Eastern Time

How can texts and techniques from the humanities disrupt unexamined positions, put human faces to abstract ideas, and help open up spaces where dialogue and consensus might emerge on historic and contemporary questions about citizenship and who deserves it? What models exist for training dialogue facilitators who can help encourage listening and perspective taking across seemingly intractable positions?

Presenters:

  • Verdis Robinson, Interim National Manager, The Democracy Commitment
  • Caryn McTighe Musil, Senior Director of Civic Learning and Democracy Initiatives, Association of American Colleges and Universities
  • John Soltes, Communication Department, County College of Morris
  • Jason Zelesky, Dean of Students, Mount Wachusett Community College

RSVP HERE. 


Upcoming Webinars:
Webinar #2: Income Inequality and the Cost of Citizenship

October 27, 2016 | 3:00–4:00 p.m. Eastern Time

When economic disparities—often intertwined with ethnic, racial, and religious differences—impose real limitations on public participation, how can the humanities provide insights into the historic and persistent reality of differential access to full citizenship rights? Learn how several campuses have engaged their students and communities in examining this issue.

Presenters:

  • Steve Davis, History Department, Lone Star College, Kingwood
  • Jill A. Schennum, Chair, Anthropology, Social Sciences, and Economics, County College of Morris
  • Seth Howard, Assistant Director, Center for Civic Engagement, Lone Star College
  • Fagan Forhan, Assistant Dean of K-12 Partnerships and Civic Engagement, Mount Wachusett Community College

Hosts:

  • Verdis Robinson, Interim National Manager, The Democracy Commitment
  • Caryn McTighe Musil, Senior Director of Civic Learning and Democracy Initiatives, Association of American Colleges and Universities

RSVP HERE.


Webinar #3:  I Want My Country Back: Immigration, Race, and Citizenship
November 3, 2016 | 3:00–4:00 p.m. Eastern Time

In the midst of sometimes-dramatic demographic and cultural shifts, how have the humanities served to illuminate felt experiences, historical contexts, and ethical issues as the rich mosaic of people in the United States fluctuates? What approaches, courses, and public events lead to shared ends rather than perpetual conflict or feelings of displacement?

Presenters:

  • David Kalivas, World History and Director of the Commonwealth Honors Program, Middlesex Community College
  • Helen-Margaret Nasser, Associate Director of the Honors Program, Kingsborough Community College
  • Dona Cady, Dean, Global Education, and Matthew Olson, Dean, Humanities and Social Sciences, Middlesex Community College
  • David Price, History Department, and Vilma E. Fuentes, Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs, Santa Fe College

Hosts:

  • Verdis Robinson, Interim National Manager, The Democracy Commitment
  • Caryn McTighe Musil, Senior Director of Civic Learning and Democracy Initiatives, Association of American Colleges and Universities

RSVP HERE.


Please Share with Any Interested Parties

 

Funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities and hosted by the Association of American Colleges and Universities & The Democracy Commitment.

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations endowment for the expressed in these webinars do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Citizenship Under Siege Webinar Series from TDC and AAC&U

We the People FB Banner CTZN7 sized logos_0

Citizenship Under Siege:
Promoting Listening, Learning, and Engagement

Fall 2016 Webinar Series

The US Constitution’s preamble speaks of “We the People”—but who is considered part of that sacred circle, and how has this group varied over time? When national identity is hotly contested, what does it mean to experience citizenship as partial, denied, or fully acknowledged? How can the humanities illuminate differing narratives and open up space for understanding, connections, and shared visions of the future?

The Association of American Colleges and Universities and The Democracy Commitment invite faculty, staff, students, and campus community partners to join in one or all of three FREE webinars. These events are designed to expand campus expertise on how to hold constructive conversations about contentious issues and how to institute practices in and out of the classroom that foster engagement across differences.

More information is available here.

A Three-Part Series
3:00–4:00 p.m. Eastern Time

From Fractious Differences to Engaged Dialogues (October 13, 2016)
How can texts and techniques from the humanities disrupt unexamined positions, put human faces to abstract ideas, and help open up spaces where dialogue and consensus might emerge on historic and contemporary questions about citizenship and who deserves it? What models exist for training dialogue facilitators who can help encourage listening and perspective taking across seemingly intractable positions? (Register online)

Income Inequality and the Cost of Citizenship (October 27, 2016)
When economic disparities—often intertwined with ethnic, racial, and religious differences—impose real limitations on public participation, how can the humanities provide insights into the historic and persistent reality of differential access to full citizenship rights? Learn how several campuses have engaged their students and communities in examining this issue. (Register online)

I Want My Country Back: Immigration, Race, and Citizenship (November 3, 2016)
In the midst of sometimes-dramatic demographic and cultural shifts, how have the humanities served to illuminate felt experiences, historical contexts, and ethical issues as the rich mosaic of people in the United States fluctuates? What approaches, courses, and public events lead to shared ends rather than perpetual conflict or feelings of displacement? (Register online)

Funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities and hosted by the Association of American Colleges and Universities and The Democracy Commitment.

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in these webinars do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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