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Text, Talk, Act: National Conversations about Mental Health

Text, Talk, Act is a nationwide conversation on mental health and how to help a friend in need. How does this work? A group of friends gets together and through text messaging the group receives discussion questions that lead them through a conversation about mental health. Talking about the importance of mental health issues is essential, but many people don’t know how to start the conversation.

You can register your school, club, or organization to win a prize for participating in Text, Talk, Act of $1,000 by clicking here.

TTA Infographic Fall 2015_0.

Advancing Political Engagement: Is Your Campus an NSLVE Campus?

ADP encourages its campuses to participate in The National Study of Learning, Voting, and Engagement (NSLVE). Nearly 50% of ADP campuses are already participating in this important study.

NSLVE ivotes a free opportunity for colleges and universities to learn about their student’s voting habits and build a national database for research on college student political learning and engagement in democracy. So why should your campus participate (if it isn’t already)? The goal of this program is to determine whether or how much civic engagement learning experiences increase the knowledge, skills, and commitment students need to engage in democracy, policy making, politics, and social action. While voting is not the only indicator of civic engagement it is fundamental.

Want more information? Find it here.

Want to participate? It’s free, just sign up before October 15, 2015.

All you have to do is fill out this form.

What We’re Reading–Rethinking Preparation for Work: A Civic-Enriched Liberal Education

peer reviewRethinking Preparation for Work: A Civic-Enriched Liberal Education
Peer Review Summer 2015, Vol. 17, No. 3In a world where college graduates spend the majority of their public lives engaged in work, this issue of AAC&U’s Peer Review, sponsored by the Kettering Foundation, focuses on how colleges might reconceive preparation for work in addition to preparation for citizenship. Instead of making the case for civic learning  only by noting that civic education skills also are useful in getting a job, this issue explores whether there is a more expansive and civic notion of work to which higher education might contribute. The table of contents for the Peer Review issue is below, with links to full online articles.Rethinking Preparation for Work is what we’re reading. Note the contributions by TDC’s co-founder Bernie Ronan and by ADP’s Seth Pollack and Byron White.

From the Editor
Shelley Johnson Carey


Civic-Rich Preparation for Work
Caryn McTighe Musil, AAC&U

For a Good Life: Integrating Liberal and Civic Arts Education with Work
Elizabeth Minnich, AAC&U

Civic Virtues for Work and Action
Bernie Ronan, Maricopa Community Colleges, and Derek W. M. Barker, Kettering Foundation


Be the Change: Academics as Civic Professionals
Amy Koritz, Drew University, and Paul Schadewald, Macalester College

Weaving Together Career and Civic Commitments for Social Change
José Zapata Calderón, Pitzer College, and Seth S. Pollack, California State University–Monterey Bay

Developing Lifelong Civic Habits at Widener University
James Harris, the University of San Diego and Widener University

Science, Curriculum, and Public Controversies
Kyle Powys Whyte, Michigan State University, Byron P. White, Cleveland State University, and Darlyne Menscer, Carolinas Health Care System

Crossing Disciplinary Boundaries with Civic Literacy
Mary Gowan, James Madison University, and Margaret Salazar-Porzio, Smithsonian Institution


What Does It Mean to Be an Educated Person Today?
Jean Johnson, National Issues Forums Institute


Reconstituting Civic Engagement for Tomorrow’s Students
David J. Maurrasse, Marga Incorporated and Columbia University


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