Posts Tagged 'Partners and Friends'

What We’re Reading: NERCHE’s The Challenges of Rewarding New Forms of Scholarship report

NERCHE

The Challenges of Rewarding New Forms of Scholarship: Creating Academic Cultures that Support Community-Engaged Scholarship, a new report by John Saltmarsh, John Wooding and Kat McLellan (2014) — it’s what we’re reading.

According to the authors:

The report is the result of a meeting of that took place on May 15, 2014 involving over 30 faculty and staff from all five campuses of the University of Massachusetts system. The seminar was funded with a grant from Bringing Theory to Practice and was hosted by the New England Resource Center for Higher Education (NERCHE) and Boston URBAN (Urban Research-Based Action Network).

The purpose of the seminar was to examine a wide range of faculty rewards (including promotion criteria, awards, faculty development support, and policies at various levels) that provide incentives and rewards for faculty to undertake community-engaged scholarship. Community-engaged scholarship focuses academic knowledge to address real-world issues through mutually beneficial, reciprocal collaboration with peers outside the university who have locally grounded knowledge and experience.

The report provides a set of findings and concrete recommendations for both the system office and the individual campuses for measures that can be implemented to advance community-engaged scholarship.

The authors hope that the report can serve as a tool for catalyzing a deeper conversation on campus about supporting and advancing community engaged scholarship.

Download the full report here.

 

Partner Spotlight: Roosevelt Institute Campus Network’s Rethinking Communities Project

By Eugenia Kim

Rethinking Communities is a new project launched last year by the Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network (RICN), a national student-run public policy think tank founded in the belief that students have the power to make serious change in their communities. Rethinking Communities challenges students to proactively improve university policy. Specifically, it aims to make universities aware of their economic impact as anchor institutions—large nonprofit entities that, by virtue of their mission and location, are tied to the communities in which they sit—and embrace their responsibility to those larger communities.

As students, we know that that there is a disparity in wealth distribution in this country, and that this disparity is made worse by the fact that many people have no say in their own economic futures. We also recognize that waiting on the federal government to create sweeping national change is futile. Therefore, the Rethinking Communities initiative challenges students to take action in places where they live, places they know—the communities where they go to school. The progress we hope to achieve is systematic, it’s long-term, and it attempts to build on the permanent relationships between communities and universities rather than apply simple, short-term Band-Aid solutions.

RC correctedCurrently, students who want to become engaged in politics and policy are told to volunteer, canvass, or help with voter registration. In other words, we are not asked to address systemic issues and fix the root problems. By channeling the economic and social power that universities have over the communities they reside in, we hope to tackle local issues of wealth inequality, disempowerment, and apathy born of a sense that people have no agency in their own lives.

While this initiative is largely student-led, with students researching, organizing, and writing policy suggestions, it can’t succeed without the support and cooperation of administrators, professors, and university presidents. There are many untapped, gifted students who do not know about the work we are doing. We need the help of faculty and administrators to connect RICN with other students who are also civic-minded and interested in bringing this project to their campuses.

Students also need validators once those connections are made. I never really had any interest in or thought about what a person’s civic duty should be until I was asked for my opinion  in school and in Roosevelt. Until I was given a seat at the table, I didn’t feel like I had any right to be talking. We need professors, administrators, and university presidents to push the Rethinking Communities initiative and invite students and other community members to participate.

Start by asking students the question: what do they think? Show them their voices and opinions matter by giving them the tools to truly address inequality in their local communities. Equip them with the Rethinking Communities toolbox, which can be downloaded here. Combat apathy by giving students an avenue to demand more of their universities as anchor institutions. Rethinking Communities needs your help to be a truly meaningful initiative that implements concrete change.

___

Eugenia Kim is a student at New York University and a member of the Rethinking Communities Project brain trust, a group of six students working to make the project run.

2014 National Conference on Citizenship is October 10 in Washington, DC

NCoC 2014 conferenceStrengthening Civic Life

Civic life is how we come together to accomplish big goals and overcome serious challenges. What is amazing is that it is often grounded in the smallest actions. Actions like talking with neighbors, eating with family and friends, exchanging favors, and other random acts of kindness. These acts create the social connections necessary to solving big problems and maintaining a healthy democracy.

The National Conference on Citizenship (NCoC) is an organization dedicated to strengthening civic life in America. For 70 years, NCoC’s Annual Conference has been a must attend event for community builders searching for new ways to engage their neighbors and create positive change. Given the current social and political polarization, the need for this Conference couldn’t be greater.

Leaders from the nonprofit, private, open data, and technology sectors will converge at the Conference to share best practices and uncover innovative civic engagement strategies. There will be high-quality Learning Summits, panels, and networking time – all chances to strengthen civic life and take on the issues facing our field.

We hope to see you in DC on October 10 at the 2014 National Conference on Citizenship. Click here to register.

Free Fall Webinars: Developing Social Capital with APLU

APLU’s Commission on Innovation, Competitiveness, and Economic Prosperity (CICEP) Presents:

The Social Capital Webinar Series
APLU’s Commission on Innovation invites you to join us for a series of lively conversations about the most critical aspects of innovation ecosystem development—creating trust and building social capital. This unique program is more talk show than webinar, with emphasis placed on conversation over presentation. Don’t miss out—click this link to register for one or more of the Social Capital webinars today!: http://bit.ly/1g7UWTc

social capital [soh-shuhl kap-i-tl]: (1) collective or economic benefits derived from cooperation between individuals and groups; the idea “that social networks have value”; (2) trust.

Thursday, September 18, 2 – 3pm Eastern
Civic and Social Engagement: Why Community Development Partnerships Matter
Innovation ecosystems rely not only on great talent and great innovation, but also on creating great places to live, work, and play. Place development—through social, community, and cultural partnerships—is a critical element.
Featuring: Eva Klein, University Economic Development Association (UEDA) and Eva Klein & Associates; Lloyd Jacobs, University of Toledo; (additional guest TBA)

Thursday, October 16, 2 – 3pm Eastern
Evolution of a New Paradigm: Emerging Tech Transfer Partnership Models
To make technology transfer happen in today’s innovation ecosystems, relationships must matter more than transactions. How universities interact with industry for technology transfer and development is changing, and so is the way relationships develop within the university.
Featuring: Jacob Johnson, innovosource; Valerie McDevitt, Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM); Howard Grimes, Idaho State University

Thursday, November 20, 2 – 3pm Eastern
Policies That Support Practice: What Government Does to Enable Innovation Ecosystems
We hear all the time that government should just “get out of the way” and let the private sector innovate. Could it be, though, that government is the real risk-taker that allows partnerships to grow and flourish? Federal, state, and local policy may be at the heart of innovation ecosystems.
Featuring: Dan Berglund, SSTI; Susan Sloan, National Academies Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable (GUIRR); (additional guest TBA)


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 222 other followers

Twitter


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 222 other followers