Posts Tagged 'Partner Spotlight'

Addressing Campus Sexual Assault: AASCU’s Partnership with Culture of Respect

Yesterday, AASCU President Muriel Howard sent a message to AASCU Presidents describing a new AASCU partnership with an organization called Culture of Respect. This organization, which was founded by a group of concerned parents, is an independent, nonprofit organization. They have begun a very important dialogue with the higher education community. We believe this is an opportunity to effect change through a collaborative and transformative process, one that provides resources to all involved in campus sexual assault response and prevention.

Culture of Respect’s free nonprofit website portal illustrates various tools and resources that AASCU considers helpful to colleges and universities by providing an actionable framework. We encourage you to review its content. The value of our partnership is founded on the idea that sexual assault can be mitigated and eliminated on campuses by offering a unique, centralized non-profit resource with content that spans the field from talking points for parents to breaking down complex legal information for victims and colleges. Various aspects of the website are aligned to address all segments of the campus community including students, parents and staff. We encourage you to register at CultureofRespect.org to explore the depth and breadth of their tools and resources.

Their board of advisors includes:

  • Jackie Cruz, Ed.M., Harvard Graduate School of Education;
  • Laurie Hamre, VP of Student Affairs at Macalester College;
  • Eric Hartman, Dean of Students, Sewanee, The University of the South;
  • Charlotte H. Johnson, J.D., Vice President and Dean of Students at Scripps College;
  • Martha Kanter, Former U.S. Undersecretary of Education;
  • Karestan Koenan, sexual assault and PTSD expert and Professor of Epidemiology at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health;
  • Dr. David Lisak, interpersonal violence expert;
  • Maxwell Love, President of the United States Student Association (USSA);
  • Diane Rosenfeld, LLM, Lecturer on Title IX and Director of the Gender Violence Program at Harvard Law School; and
  • Kate Walsh, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Fellow, Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University.

We hope that your campus or system will consider working with Culture of Respect as they get started. In addition, we ask that you share information about this web portal on your campus. We believe the work that they are doing is significant and will help mitigate and eliminate sexual assault on our campuses.

If you have additional questions about Culture of Respect please contact Makese Motley, AASCU’s Assistant Director of Federal Relations at motleym@aascu.org or 202-478-4652.

Partner Spotlight: Roosevelt Institute Campus Network’s Rethinking Communities Project

By Eugenia Kim

Rethinking Communities is a new project launched last year by the Roosevelt Institute | Campus Network (RICN), a national student-run public policy think tank founded in the belief that students have the power to make serious change in their communities. Rethinking Communities challenges students to proactively improve university policy. Specifically, it aims to make universities aware of their economic impact as anchor institutions—large nonprofit entities that, by virtue of their mission and location, are tied to the communities in which they sit—and embrace their responsibility to those larger communities.

As students, we know that that there is a disparity in wealth distribution in this country, and that this disparity is made worse by the fact that many people have no say in their own economic futures. We also recognize that waiting on the federal government to create sweeping national change is futile. Therefore, the Rethinking Communities initiative challenges students to take action in places where they live, places they know—the communities where they go to school. The progress we hope to achieve is systematic, it’s long-term, and it attempts to build on the permanent relationships between communities and universities rather than apply simple, short-term Band-Aid solutions.

RC correctedCurrently, students who want to become engaged in politics and policy are told to volunteer, canvass, or help with voter registration. In other words, we are not asked to address systemic issues and fix the root problems. By channeling the economic and social power that universities have over the communities they reside in, we hope to tackle local issues of wealth inequality, disempowerment, and apathy born of a sense that people have no agency in their own lives.

While this initiative is largely student-led, with students researching, organizing, and writing policy suggestions, it can’t succeed without the support and cooperation of administrators, professors, and university presidents. There are many untapped, gifted students who do not know about the work we are doing. We need the help of faculty and administrators to connect RICN with other students who are also civic-minded and interested in bringing this project to their campuses.

Students also need validators once those connections are made. I never really had any interest in or thought about what a person’s civic duty should be until I was asked for my opinion  in school and in Roosevelt. Until I was given a seat at the table, I didn’t feel like I had any right to be talking. We need professors, administrators, and university presidents to push the Rethinking Communities initiative and invite students and other community members to participate.

Start by asking students the question: what do they think? Show them their voices and opinions matter by giving them the tools to truly address inequality in their local communities. Equip them with the Rethinking Communities toolbox, which can be downloaded here. Combat apathy by giving students an avenue to demand more of their universities as anchor institutions. Rethinking Communities needs your help to be a truly meaningful initiative that implements concrete change.

___

Eugenia Kim is a student at New York University and a member of the Rethinking Communities Project brain trust, a group of six students working to make the project run.

2014 National Conference on Citizenship is October 10 in Washington, DC

NCoC 2014 conferenceStrengthening Civic Life

Civic life is how we come together to accomplish big goals and overcome serious challenges. What is amazing is that it is often grounded in the smallest actions. Actions like talking with neighbors, eating with family and friends, exchanging favors, and other random acts of kindness. These acts create the social connections necessary to solving big problems and maintaining a healthy democracy.

The National Conference on Citizenship (NCoC) is an organization dedicated to strengthening civic life in America. For 70 years, NCoC’s Annual Conference has been a must attend event for community builders searching for new ways to engage their neighbors and create positive change. Given the current social and political polarization, the need for this Conference couldn’t be greater.

Leaders from the nonprofit, private, open data, and technology sectors will converge at the Conference to share best practices and uncover innovative civic engagement strategies. There will be high-quality Learning Summits, panels, and networking time – all chances to strengthen civic life and take on the issues facing our field.

We hope to see you in DC on October 10 at the 2014 National Conference on Citizenship. Click here to register.

Partner Spotlight: NERCHE’s Spring 2014 Virtual Think Tanks

NVTT

Spring 2014 Community Engagement Virtual Think Tank Series

This was my first NERCHE webinar and it was a great experience. It was very well planned and executed, with helpful follow-up….I look forward to participating in more NERCHE webinars and sharing with my colleagues.”– Virtual Think Tank Participant

NERCHE’s Virtual Think Tanks are webinars designed for higher education practitioners engaged in collaborative change processes which address social justice in a diverse democracy. Participants have utilized Virtual Think Tanks for faculty and staff training, initiative development, and deepening reflection and discussion on their respective campuses.   Virtual Think Tanks are valuable whether participants are developing long-term strategic change efforts or thinking about immediate programming and teaching issues.

The Center’s spring 2014 Virtual Think Tanks will focus on community engagement in teaching and learning, research, and institutional structures within higher education. 

Spring 2014 Virtual Think Tank Session Descriptions
 
4/2/14 The New Faculty Majority and Civic Engagement
The majority of all college faculty now work on part-time or full-time temporary contracts, and many lack sufficient access to the institutional support that is necessary for quality education. In many fields, the majority of adjuncts are no longer simply traditional “second career” or “teaching professionals” but rather trained academics who are encountering a starkly downsized tenure-track job market.This virtual think tank will explore how campuses can advance student civic learning and democratic engagement when a faculty majority lacks a full voice in campus governance and is treated as second class institutional citizens; how campuses sustain long-term relationships with formal obligations in community partnerships while not providing the institutional support for a majority of faculty; how faculty can pursue community engaged teaching and learning on public issues without the protections of academic freedom. How can campuses advance civic engagement without advancing the professional working conditions of faculty who do not have the rights and protections of tenure?
Maria Maisto (New Faculty Majority)
Register Here
4/23/14 The Politics of Community Engagement: Engaging Values Beyond Partisan Posturing
There is a contradiction at the heart of the higher education civic engagement discourse–that we may be objective and neutral while we engage in an act as overtly political as building democratic citizens. This webinar will briefly review the theoretical bases of democracy and its requirements while illuminating the ways in which those requirements express political actions and values choices. The webinar discussion will then turn to applied approaches to rigorously engaging values discourse in the classroom without falling into partisan bickering or ideological straightjackets.
Eric Hartman (Providence College)
Register Here
5/7/14 Becoming Stewards of Place: Strategies for Institution-Community Engagement
At a time when traditional institutions feel besieged by a rapidly changing landscape, defining themselves as “stewards of place” offers new possibilities. Collaborating with communities and thinking of the border between campus and community as a permeable boundary provide new insights and opportunities for teaching, research, and service. This webinar will focus on AASCU’s two 2014 monographs in the Stewards of Place series, both of which demonstrate that stewardship of place can make institutions stronger and more relevant in the 21st century.
George Mehaffy (AASCU)
Register Here

Registration and Cost:

The registration fee for participation in each real-time Virtual Think Tank session is $195.  For more information on payment methods, please see our Virtual Think Tank FAQs.

Recordings: 

NERCHE also offers recordings of  its spring 2014 Virtual Think Tanks for $100. Recordings will be made available on the NERCHE website to registrants one week after the real-time sessions. Purchase a recording here.
For an archive of NERCHE’s past Virtual Think Tanks available for purchase, click here.

CIRCLE Working Paper Examines Civics, Digital Badges and Alternative Assessments

CIRCLE LogoWith support from the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, CIRCLE published “New and Alternative Assessments, Digital Badges, and Civics: An Overview of Emerging Themes and Promising Directions” (March 2013) which explores digital badges and alternative assessments for civic skills, knowledge, and dispositions. This working paper also considers ePortfolios, rubrics, games, simulations, and other assessment and learning tools that might expand options for those committed to improving civic education.

States are, to a greater extent, using multiple-choice-only tests that focus primarily on memorizing information, rather than demonstrating civic skills. Furthermore, assessments focus mostly on the history and geography of the United States; far fewer states assess students in world affairs or economics. Are we preparing and assessing students to be engaged citizens?

CIRCLE explores this question and the broader landscape of alternative assessments, here, in an online presentation.

For more information, go here.

Sponsor Spotlight: The New York Times in Education

Guest Post by Lynn M. Hall, National Education DIrector, The New York Times

inEducation_Logo_NOURL_4C_RP3

You’ve known us as The New York Times in College, but we have taken a new name — The New York Times in Education – to better communicate with audiences abroad as well as here in the U.S.

We’ve also launched these exciting resources that we hope you will view and share:

  • An elegant new Web site at our old address, www.nytimes.com/edu. We welcome your contributions to our Classroom Ideas section!
  • The New York Times in Education YouTube channel, where you can watch exclusive, 30-minute Webcasts with Times journalists addressing focus areas of our Leadership and First Year programs. Visit www.nytimes.com/edu/video.
  • An inspiring, two-minute video that introduces our multimedia journalism: “The New York Times: Because The World Has a Lot To Teach.”  Watch in at www.nytimes.com/edu/video.

Please contact me at lynn.hall@nytimes.com if you wish to contribute your classroom ideas to our new Web site, or for further information about our program.

#ADPTDC13: Sponsor Spotlight — Lyon Software

We’re excited that for the second year in a row, Lyon Software is a sponsor of the ADP/TDC National Meeting! Lyon Software is also an ADP Partner working to support our Campus & Community Civic Health Initiative. A number of ADP campuses use Lyon Software to track civic engagement and community service efforts on their campuses.

By Jessica Franchino, CBISA Specialist/Event Coordinator, Lyon Software

Lyon SoftwareAt Lyon Software, we believe in helping you and your community achieve a better tomorrow.  We enable our clients to track how their programs and partnerships are working together to improve the communities they serve.  Track both quantitative and qualitative data about your programs to make sure they are meeting the needs of your community and your organization.  Easy reporting features allow you to report to your stakeholders with the click of a button.  Customizable features ensure your community and their specific needs are tracked.  Let us show you a whole new world of data.

Come talk to us and check out our giveaways at our table, which will be set up during the ADP National Meeting!


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