Posts Tagged 'Ideas for Campus Programming'

Georgia College Teach-In: Events in Ferguson, Missouri

By Gregg Kaufman, ADP National Steering Committee Member

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Georgia College Teach-in on “Events in Ferguson, MO”

A standing room only crowd of nearly 150 students, faculty, staff, and community citizens attended a teach-in at Georgia College that addressed the events in Ferguson, MO and the related issues of race, class, and inequity in American society. Panelists representing a variety of academic disciplines and campus safety spoke, after which audience members asked questions. The presentations included “The Talk” that many young African American males hear about self-protection, black male stereotypes, sociological principles such as “othering,” human geography scales, and finally a critical thinking process based on the principle of charitable interpretation.

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Standing-room only crowd at teach-in.

Approximately half the audience represented local citizens and several people commented that they hoped more teach-ins would provide opportunities for learning and dialogue. Another common idea involved hosting a conversation among campus and community citizens with the police departments that share responsibility for public safety.

A student-led educational event and candlelight vigil for Michael Brown and the Ferguson community was held the next evening on the front campus.

2014 Important ADP Dates and Deadlines

Here are some important dates on our calendar for the upcoming year. What other civic engagement related events are on your calendar?

ImportantDatesLg2014

January

February

March

  • March 10: ADP/TDC National Meeting proposers notified

April

May

June

July

  • July 4: Independence Day

August

September

  • September 1: Labor Day
  • September 17: Constitution Day
  • September 29: Minnesota Regional ADP Meeting

November

AASCU & ADP on the Federal Government Shutdown

Gov't ClosedThe federal government shutdown is garnering a great deal of attention and outrage. Late last week, AASCU, along with five other national higher education associations, issued a joint community statement on the shutdown, calling for our campuses to treat it as a teachable moment and to encourage civic learning and engagement (see below).

AASCU’s American Democracy Project also sent out a query asking campus coordinators if they were utilizing the government shutdown for the purposes mentioned above and, if so, how they were doing it. Stephen F. Austin State University’s (Texas) Democracy Wall, a free speech area similar to the Democracy Plaza at Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), is dedicated to the shutdown this month. SUNY Buffalo State is engaging in classroom-based discussion of the shutdown vis a vis the private capture of public goods and Larry Diamond’s “Physician Heal Thyself” chapters from his 2009 book The Spirit of Democracy: The Struggle to Build Free Societies Throughout the World. And at Western Carolina University, the International Programs & Services office is making sure that students studying abroad or planning to go abroad are well aware of how passport, visas, embassies, and consulates are functioning in face of the shutdown.

Community Statement on Shutdown of the Federal Government

Muriel Howard HeadshotMy colleagues and I write as college and university leaders, concerned about the effect that the ongoing political paralysis in Washington is having on our country. The shutdown of federal agencies and the potential for default if the government’s borrowing limit is not raised are having a significant effect on the nation’s economy and many of our fellow citizens. This stalemate threatens to exacerbate the cynicism Americans already feel about the function and importance of their government.

This is a challenging time for our democratic process, a process which has served our country well for more than 200 years.

We are deeply concerned by the growing resignation of the American people to this “new normal”: the idea that Washington is so broken and dysfunctional that it cannot be fixed, only ignored or ridiculed. Our democratic government is most effective when it embraces open discourse, bipartisan cooperation and the art of compromise. These traditions have served us well since our founding, and are at the heart of the success of the American Experiment.

We believe this gradual acceptance of government dysfunction should be vigorously challenged and that each college and university can play a role in doing so. We call on colleges and universities around the country to bring together students, business and community leaders, and the public to engage in conversations and to be active engaged citizens. We should focus attention on the processes that ensure responsible government and sound budget policy.

Our nation was built upon the idea of a new form of government. Inherent in this promise is the idea of compromise and respect for the views of others. The belief in ideas and respect for conflicting viewpoints is also a core purpose of education. Together we can and must act to ensure the current stalemate in Washington is used to renew our students’ interest and commitment to democracy, rather than to discourage it.

We hope each of our institutions will make that possibility real for students and communities across the nation.

With warm regards,
Muriel A. Howard, Ph.D.
President
American Association of State Colleges and Universities

In cooperation with:

Walter G. Bumphus, President
American Association of Community Colleges

Molly Corbett Broad, President
American Council on Education

M. Peter McPherson, President
Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities

Hunter R. Rawlings III, President
Association of American Universities

David L. Warren, President
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities

It’s Coming…Constitution Day 2013

On Tuesday, September 17, 2013, we will be celebrating Constitution Day, which commemorates the formation and signing of the U.S. Constitution by the 39 Founding Fathers on Sept. 17, 1787.

With the semester underway and the date rapidly approaching, we wanted to both remind you of the date and offer some resources that may be of use to you in your planning process.

  • More information can be found on our ADP page dedicated to Constitution day; to visit that page, click here.
  • Ideas for campus programming gleaned from years past can be found on our ADP blog; to visit the blog, click here.

ADP Campus Coordinators, please be on the lookout for a survey from ADP National later today  regarding your plans for this Constitution Day.

Important ADP Dates & Deadlines

Here are some important dates on our calendar for the upcoming academic year. What other civic engagement related events are on your calendar?

Dates

2013

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

Celebrate Rosa Parks on National Day of Courage | February 4, 2013

National Day of Courage logo

Guest blog post by The Henry Ford

On Feb. 4, The Henry Ford is celebrating what would have been Rosa Parks’ 100th birthday with a National Day of Courage.

Mrs. Parks wasn’t looking to start a movement when she refused to give up her bus seat to a white man on Dec. 1, 1955, but instead was acting upon a courageous response to her instincts. Mrs. Parks later said of that day, “When I made that decision, I knew that I had the strength of my ancestors with me.”

In 2001 The Henry Ford became the home to Montgomery, Ala., bus No. 2857, the very bus that Mrs. Parks refused to give up her seat on. The bus has become a symbol for courage and strength as many believe Mrs. Parks’ actions that day sparked the American Civil Rights Movement.

Starting the National Day of Courage off is American Civil Rights activist and leader Julian Bond. In the 1960s, Mr. Bond founded the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and would later go on to serve as chairman of the NAACP. Joining him during the day are contributing Newsweek editor Eleanor Clift, Rosa Parks biographers Jeanne Theoharis and Douglas Brinkley, and author and Wayne State University Assistant Professor Danielle McGuire.

Thanks to our partners at Detroit Public Television, a live stream of the day’s events will be available to watch online on the National Day of Courage website. After the National Day of Courage, make sure to visit DPTV’s website for additional interviews and highlights.

We’re excited to announce that in addition to a day packed with activities, The Henry Ford will be dedicating the new Rosa Parks Forever stamp from the United States Postal Service.

Our celebration of Mrs. Parks and her courage isn’t just here in the museum. No matter where you are you can Rosa Parks Stampparticipate digitally as we share stories of hope and inspiration.

Online we’re asking individuals to post their messages of courage by sharing a digital Facebook badge. We even have a plain badge that you can download and write your own message on. If you do, make sure to take a picture of yourself wearing it and tag us on Facebook or Twitter with the hashtag #dayofcourage.

While the special activities for the National Day of Courage happen for just one day, we’ll be sharing some of our significant Civil Rights artifacts all throughout the month of February. For the latest information on the National Day of Courage, make sure to visit our event page and website.


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