Posts Tagged 'eCitizenship'



eCitizenship Webinar Series | Upcoming Webinars and Recordings Now Available

ecitizenship_color

2013-2014 Webinar Series:

  • What is eCitizenship? (September 26, 2013) | Recording | PDF
    Presented by the eCitizenship leadership team, this webinar introduces ADP’s eCitizenship initiative. It includes a brief summary and history of the initiative; information on eCitizenship partner organizations, including TurboVote and GiveGab, which campuses can utilize to increase engagement on their campuses; and a summary of research that has been done on technology and democracy among college students.
  • Where Do Students Get Their News and Why Does It Matter? (October 24, 2013) | Recording |  PDF
    Presented by Chapman Rackaway, a political science professor at Fort Hays State University (Kan.), this webinar summarizes research on the ways college students access information and how that impacts their engagement. It also provides insight on ways to use this information in classes and university programs that seek to help students think critically about the information they access online. This webinar also introduces participants to eCitizenship’s Informed Citizen Project.
  • “Shared Values and Collective Impact (December 5, 2013) | Recording | PDF
    Presented by Jeff Cohen, Director, FSG, this webinar focuses on increasing the impact of engagement among college students.

Upcoming:

  • Project Management for Student Leadership (January 23, 2014 | 1:30 p.m. Eastern)
    This webinar will focus on strategies for training students to lead community engaged projects.

  • Sustaining Student Leadership on Civic Engagement Projects (February 20, 2014 | 1:30 p.m. Eastern)
    This is the fifth and final of a series of five webinars related to the eCitizenship initiative. This webinar will focus on ways to deal with the high rates of student turnover that sometimes doom large civic engagement projects. Specifically, the presenters will discuss strategies for sustaining student leadership after previous leaders move on to graduation or other activities.

Two Upcoming Events: eCitizenship Webinar #3 and NERCHE’s December 18 Virtual Think Tank

 Make sure that you are signed up for these two awesome and upcoming opportunities:

ecitizenship_color_small

eCitizenship Webinar #3: Shared Values and Collective Impact
GiveGab.com
Tonyehn N. Verkitus, GiveGab.com
December 5, 2013 1:30-2:30 PM (Eastern)

The third of five eCitizenship webinars, entitled, “Shared Values and Collective Impact” will be presented by Tonyehn N. Verkitus of GiveGab.com and will be focused on increasing the impact of engagement among college students.

TO JOIN THIS EVENT, on Thursday, December 5th at 1:30 p.m. EDT, visit: https://aascu.adobeconnect.com/r1edh2g6z4v/ to view the webinar AND then via phone (US Toll Free: 1-866-642-1665, enter participant code 499385) to access the audio for the meeting.

Also, be sure to mark your calendars for the remaining two webinars:

  • January 23, 2014 @ 1:30pm EDT
    “Project Management for Student Leadership”
  • February 20, 2014 @ 1:30pm EDT
    “Sustaining Student Leadership on Civic Engagement Projects”

NERCHE

NERCHE Virtual Think Tank
Academic Personnel Review and Engagement
Michael Bernstein, Provost, Tulane University
December 18, 2013 | 12:00-1:30 PM (Eastern)

About the Session
In recent years, much has been written and discussed about the need for U. S. colleges and universities to aggressively and creatively engage society’s most pressing challenges-from questions of technology and globalization to the cultures of capitalism and personal identity to the long-term implications of climate change and environmental degradation. Thus, increasing numbers of colleges and universities have undertaken innovative efforts to reinvigorate civic engagement or a “covenant” with society that commits faculty, students, and administrators to apply their skills, resources, and talents to address important issues affecting local communities, the nation, and the world. This webinar considers how colleges and universities can integrate faculty engagement in academic-review processes and emphasizes the importance of expanding institutions’ understanding of the traditional review categories of research, teaching, and service to reflect achievements and successes in the area of public engagement.

About the Presenter
Professor Michael Bernstein was appointed the 11th Provost of Tulane University in July of 2007. He came to Tulane from the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), where he served as  the Dean of Arts and Humanities and as a Professor of History. In the past several years, he has been a principal leader in the deployment of Tulane’s “Renewal Plan” – the blueprint for recovery that has both sustained and transformed the University in the wake of the tragic impacts of Hurricane Katrina.

Register for this Session

Text, Talk, Act to Improve Mental Health

Creating Community Solutions, part of the National Dialogue on Mental Health, is hosting a nationwide discussion on mental health using text messaging technology. “Text, Talk, Act to Improve Mental Health” will be held on December 5th – people from all over the country will join together in small groups for one-hour discussions on mental health. Participants will receive polling & discussion questions and process suggestions via text message.

Mental Health

The process is simple:
1. Receive reminders and materials before the event at the TextTalkAct webpage (this step is optional)
2. Bring some people together on December 5th
3. Form into groups of 4-5, with at least one cellphone per group
4. Text “start” to 89800

Participants can host their one-hour discussion at any time on December 5th. This event was created as an easy way for people to organize discussions on mental health, and the text messaging technology is being utilized to encourage young people to join, using technology that is ubiquitous in their lives.

Results from the live polling questions will be tabulated almost instantly, so that people will be able to see how participants across the country responded. The discussion questions will provide a safe space for candid dialogue on mental health, one of the most critical and misunderstood public issues we face. The process will also provide an opportunity for participants to discuss actions they can take to strengthen mental health on their campuses and in their communities.

This December 5th, join Creating Community Solutions in a nationwide discussion on mental health….via your cell phone. All over the country, on the same day, people will get together in small groups for one-hour discussions on mental health.

eCitizenship Webinar #2 on Thursday; How to Attend

On Thursday, citizenship goes digital again as the American Democracy Project’s eCitizenship initiative presents its second webinar, entitled, “Where Do Students Get Their News and Why Does It Matter?” See below for more information on content and how to access the presentation.

ecitizenship_color_small

Thursday, October 24, 2013 @ 1:30 p.m. EDT
eCitizenship Webinar (2):
Where Do Students Get Their News and Why Does It Matter?”
Online

This webinar will summarize research on the ways college students access information and how that impacts their engagement. It will also provide insight on ways to use this information in classes and university programs that seek to help students think critically about the information they access online.

Chapman Rackaway, a political science professor  at Fort Hays State University, will also share the Informed Citizen Project with attendees.

In the pursuit of greater student engagement, ADP has tried to encourage civic participation among students.  The eCitizenship initiative focuses ADP’s efforts in the online world.   To help build the skills that college students need, the Informed Citizen Project brings campuses together to develop and share efforts towards one of civic engagement’s most important foundational skills: media and information literacy.

Media and information literacy are more important than ever.  The fragmented media environment requires that we are more critical of the information we consume than ever.  Online text, audio, and video tools all make for new ways to communicate and engage in civic leadership.  Web 2.0 tools mean that content consumers are now creators and must be cautious about what we communicate to the whole world.  The prevalence of polls mean that today’s voter must understand how survey research works to ensure they maximize the informational value of polls.

The Informed Citizen Project Areas of focus:

1)      News consumption

2)      Recall of news

3)      Print and online media

4)      Web 2.0 and students as content producers

5)      Source differentiation

6)      Critical thinking

7)      Polling and data criticism

The Informed Citizen Project is beginning to add member schools who are currently engaged in or interested in creating media and information literacy programs to join.  Project member schools share best practices in college-level media and information literacy and innovate new programs to ensure the next generation of graduates have the critical thinking skills necessary to be leaders in today’s society.

TO JOIN THIS EVENT, on Thursday, October 24th at 1:30 p.m. EDT, visit: https://aascu.adobeconnect.com/r41deke3ok5/ to view the webinar AND then via phone (US Toll Free: 1-866-642-1665, enter participant code 499385) to access the audio for the meeting.

Also, be sure to mark your calendars for the other three webinars:

  • December 5, 3013 @ 1:30pm EDT
    “Shared Values and Collective Impact”
  • January 23, 2014 @ 1:30pm EDT
    “Project Management for Student Leadership”
  • February 20, 2014 @ 1:30pm EDT
    “Sustaining Student Leadership on Civic Engagement Projects”

What We’re Reading: eCitizenship Special Issue of the eJournal of Public Affairs

eJournal_banner

Volume 2, Issue 1 of the eJournal of Public Affairs — a collaborative effort between Missouri State University and AASCU’s American Democracy Project was just released. This is a special issue dedicated to ADP’s eCitizenship Initiative and is guest edited by the Faculty Chair of eCitizenship, Mike Stout who is an associate professor of sociology at Missouri State.

This special issue contains a Guest Editor’s Introduction and three peer-reviewed articles that consider ways in which social media is being used to further civic learning goals. You’ll find abstracts of the introduction and the articles below and more information about ADP’s eCitizenship Initiative here.

Guest Editor’s Introduction

Guest Editor’s Introduction

Michael Stout, Ph.D.
Apr 29, 2013 • Vol 2, Issue 1
On occasion the eJournal of Public Affairs publishes special issues highlighting research and best practices related to American Democracy Project (ADP) initiatives. This special issue is organized around the ADP eCitizenship initiative and it highlights three projects that relate to ways social media technologies are being used to teach students civic skills on four college campuses in the United States.
Civil Dialogue for the Twenty-First Century: Two Models for Promoting Thoughtful Dialogue Around Current Issues on a College Campus

Civil Dialogue for the Twenty-First Century: Two Models for Promoting Thoughtful Dialogue Around Current Issues on a College Campus

Emma Humphries, Ph.D., Shelby Taylor and H. Anne Weiss
Apr 29, 2013 • Vol 2, Issue 1
This manuscript describes two models for promoting civil dialogue around important social and political issues on a college campus—Democracy Plaza at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) and The Civil Debate Wall at the University of Florida (UF)— and examines the differing types of expression fostered by each platform, as well as the strengths and weaknesses of each platform. By doing so, it offers important insights for institutions of higher learning that seek to promote not just civil dialogue, but also a culture of civility and engagement, on their respective campuses. Whether armed with a budget of one million dollars or just one thousand dollars, campuses can and should create spaces for meaningful dialogue surrounding important issues.

iPolitics: Talking Government with the American Idol GenerationiPolitics: Talking Government with the American Idol Generation

William J. Miller, Ph.D.
Apr 29, 2013 • Vol 2, Issue 1
In 2008, Mark Bauerlein sent a shot across the bow of the Millennial generation, suggesting in The Dumbest Generation that no one in our country under the age of 30 could be trusted. Bauerlein warned that: Millennials “care about what occurred last week in the cafeteria, not what took place during the Great Depression…they heed the words of Facebook, not the Gettysburg Address.” Yet this should not be the case since the constant communication amongst their peer groups has made it so that “equipped with a Blackberry and laptop, sporting a flashy profile page and a blog…teenagers pass words and images back and forth 24/7.” In this article, I conduct a survey of Millennial college students to test their political knowledge and awareness in comparison to their understanding of pop culture. I then see how they respond to the unspoken challenge issued to them by Bauerlein.

Tomorrow’s People: Using Facebook to Advance Civic Engagement  and Global Learning in a First-Year Seminar

Tomorrow’s People: Using Facebook to Advance Civic Engagement and Global Learning in a First-Year Seminar

Carlton A. Usher II, Ph.D.

Apr 29, 2013 • Vol 2, Issue 1
This research examines the use of Facebook as an instructional tool in two first-year seminar courses during two consecutive years. The convergence of social media and in-class instruction throughout the semesters was examined to identify whether Facebook has positive utility in teaching and learning. The areas of convergence focused on two learning outcomes, global learning and civic awareness and engagement. In order to assess learning effectiveness and participation, student perception of the efficacy of convergence was collected using an automated response and data collection system. Additionally, pre- and post-course surveys, real-time assessment of learning goals, and a questionnaire on Facebook were used to assess Facebook utility. This research found a significant level of viability for Facebook in a first-year seminar course for students in transition. Accordingly this research offers the foundation for the use of Facebook as a pedagogical technique and how to best execute these learning opportunities. While research concerning Facebook utility appears to offer mixed assessment of value, these results are consistent with the ever-increasing evaluation that tends to offer a positive assessment of Facebook’s viability and effectiveness.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 217 other followers

Twitter


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 217 other followers