Journal of Public Deliberation | The State of the Field

Journal of Public Deliberation

publicdeliberation.net/jpd 

Laura W. Black, PhD, Editor
Timothy J. Shaffer, PhD & Nancy L. Thomas, JD, EdD, Associate Editors
______________________________________________________________

ANNOUNCEMENT
July 2, 2014
Special Issue: The State of the Field
Essays on the accomplishments of and challenges to public engagement and deliberative democracy

Edited by Laura W. Black, Timothy J. Shaffer, and Nancy L. Thomas

This special issue of the Journal of Public Deliberation consists of a collection essays by leading innovators and scholars who share a commitment to increased and improved participation by everyday Americans in public discourse, community problem solving, and social policy making.  The “field” of public deliberation has made impressive advances in the last thirty years in both theory and practice.

Despite these gains, many scholars and practitioners can point to challenges and concerns, ranging from “what do we call this work?” to “how do we build a strong civic infrastructure for public engagement?”  Writers responded to questions about the scope and boundaries of the work, the relationship between deliberation and democracy, the tensions between advocacy and deliberation, the risks associated with steadfast neutrality, and future directions for the field. They help us see that popular declarations in favor of “more public participation” require more reflection and intentionality.  The issue also includes promising future directions, some insightful personal essays, and reviews of books that highlight the breadth of deliberative engagement. To read the issue, visit http://www.publicdeliberation.net/jpd/.

The Journal of Public Deliberation is supported by the Deliberative Democracy Consortium and the International Association for Public Participation. This issue is being used as the basis for discussion and planning at the 2014 Frontiers of Democracy conference, July 16-18, 2014 at Tufts University. For information on the conference, please visit http://activecitizen.tufts.edu/civic-studies/frontiers/.

An annual event, Frontiers is co-sponsored by the Deliberative Democracy Consortium, The Democracy Imperative, the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE), and the Jonathan M. Tisch College for Citizenship and Public Service at Tufts University. After the conference, there will be a reflective essay in the Journal of Public Deliberation based on the discussion that takes place at Frontiers to continue the conversation about the state of the field of public deliberation and its future.

JPD is supported not only by IAP2 and DDC, but by a range of other institutions, including:

Partner Spotlight: 3rd Annual Lynton Colloquium on the Scholarship of Engagement

Save the Date!

NERCHE and CED Present the 3rdAnnual Lynton Colloquium on the Scholarship of Engagement

The Next Generation of Engaged Scholarship: Make Your Voice Heard

Monday, September 15, 2014
9 AM to 3:30 PM
University of Massachusetts Boston

On Monday, September 15, 2014, the New England Resource Center for Higher Education (NERCHE) will host its 3rd Annual Lynton Colloquium on the Scholarship of Engagement at the University of Massachusetts Boston.  The event will build upon the success of the 2013 Colloquium, where nearly 150 faculty and higher education administrators from New England (and beyond) gathered to reflect upon the pioneering work of Ernest A. Lynton and the legacy of his contributions to publicly engaged scholarship.

The 3rd Annual Lynton Colloquium will feature a keynote presentation by the recipient of the 2014 Lynton Award (to be announced in August 2014). It will also help launch a new research initiative co- sponsored by New England Resource Center for Higher Education (NERCHE) and the Center for Engaged Democracy (CED). Grounded in the work of NERCHE’s Next Generation Engagement project and the CED’s focus on academic programs in civic engagement, this initiative aims to identify key issues in the field and sponsor research working groups on each of them. The goal is to foster sustained and systematic investigations and documented outcomes that will support deeper understandings of and clearer actions around such issues. Registration for the Colloquium is at http://www.umb.edu/news_events_media/events/lynton2014.

Download the 2014 Lynton Colloquium flyer.

What’s New with ADP? July 2014 Edition

SAVE THE DATE

  • #ADPTDC15 National Meeting in New Orleans June 4-6, 2015

ANNOUNCEMENTS

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE BLOG

Minnesota ADP/TDC/CC Civic Summit
September 28-29, 2014, St. Cloud State University (Minn.) will host a collaborative regional civic engagement conference, designed by two partner organizations, AASCU’s American Democracy Project (ADP) and Minnesota Campus Compact, and now joined by a new community college civic education organization, The Democracy Commitment (TDC).  The conference brings together administrators, faculty, staff, students and community partners to further advance the progress we have made together at a regional summit at on September 28 and 29, 2014. Read more here.

#ADPTDC14 Meeting in Review: Forging Civic Pathways for Student Success
Our recent 2014 ADP/TDC National Meeting in Louisville, Ky. brought together a collection of faculty, students, administrators, community partners and representatives from our national sponsor and partner organizations committed to advancing civic learning and engagement through public higher education. Collectively, we considered how to advance civic pathways for student success—by identifying existing pathways and forging new ones. We also contemplated the role of social media in our work and the relationship between journalism and our democracy. Together, we celebrated another year of doing hard and important work by sharing stories and strategies for scaling up and focusing our efforts to drive civic learning and engagement into the core of higher education. We committed ourselves to continuing to work to equip all students with the civic knowledge, skills, experiences and dispositions they need to be successful throughout their careers and as citizens. Read more here. You can also read about the 2014 ADP/TDC Day of Service

What We’re Reading: The Impossible Will Take a Little While
Paul Loeb, founder of the Campus Election Engagement Project, has an updated edition of his political hope anthology, The Impossible Will Take a Little While. Loeb distributed free exam copies at June’s 2014 ADP/TDC National Meeting. Read more here.

Economic Inequality: Announcing a Joint ADP/TDC National Initiative
This joint national initiative is being organized by teams at ADP’s Keene State College (N.H.) and TDC’s Mount Wachusett Community College (Mass.). We are looking to identify two- and four-year institutions interested in helping us engage and begin to form civic pathways around this topic. A formal call for participation will be forthcoming. Read more here.

Massachusetts Adopts Policy on Civic Learning for Public Higher Education
In May, the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education (BHE) became the first in the nation to adopt a policy on civic learning for public college and university students. With the new policy, public two- and four- year higher education institutions in Massachusetts will be required to incorporate civic learning as an “expected outcome” for undergraduate students. Read more here.

Student Spotlight: CSU Fresno’s Elizabeth Olenchalk
California State University, Fresno junior Elizabeth Olenchalk was named a 2014 Newman Civic Fellow in recognition of her commitment to community service and civic leadership. Read more here.

Partners & Friends

DATES FOR YOUR CALENDAR

August 4-8:  ADP’s 2014 Stewardship of Public Lands Faculty Seminar in Yellowstone
September 17:  Constitution Day
September 28:  National Voter Registration Day
September 28-29: Minnesota ADP/TDC/CC Civic Summit
October 10: NCoC’s National Conference (Washington, DC)
November 4:  Election Day

Free Webinar: National Assessment of Service and Community Engagement (NASCE)

nasce_webinarPlease join us on Tuesday, July 22nd at 2pm EST for a free webinar to learn more about the National Assessment of Service and Community Engagement (NASCE).  As part of an ongoing partnership with AASCU’s American Democracy Project and NASPA’s Lead Initiative, the NASCE assessment is being offered to member institutions at a 50% discount for the 2014-2015 academic year.

The NASCE is a web-based survey administered by the Siena College Research Institute that measures an institution’s overall levels of community engagement by evaluating the rate, frequency, and depth of student community service across 9 areas of human need, and assessing student motivations for, obstacles to, and perceptions of service. To date, the instrument has been completed by more than 30,000 college students from over 60 institutions.

For this webinar, join Dr. Don Levy, Director of the Siena College Research Institute and co-creator of the NASCE as he describes the methodology of the instrument, the survey administration process, and the utility of the data for institutional strategic planning related to community engagement.

When:  Tuesday, July 22, 2014 at 2 PM Eastern
Please RSVP to adp@aascu.org with your intent to participate in this free webinar. You’ll be provided with login details upon confirming your participation!

More information is available on this flyer.

Minnesota ADP/TDC/CC Civic Summit

Ten years ago, St. Cloud State University (Minn.) hosted one of the first collaborative regional conferences of AASCU’s American Democracy Project (ADP) and Minnesota Campus Compact. Today, civic engagement is more widely recognized as a strategy for supporting students’ academic success and preparation for work, life and citizenship. Yet our work is not finished, and our campuses continue to seek deeper integration of civic learning and engagement into the student experience and campus culture, as well as a clearer sense of the public and educational value of civic work.

This September 28th and 29th, St. Cloud State University will again host another collaborative regional civic engagement conference, designed by two partner organizations, AASCU’s American Democracy Project (ADP) and Minnesota Campus Compact, and now joined by a new community college civic education organization, The Democracy Commitment (TDC).  The conference brings together administrators, faculty, staff, students and community partners to further advance the progress we have made together at a regional summit at on September 28 and 29, 2014.

Those in attendance at the Realizing the Civic Mission of Minnesota State Colleges and Universities conference can expect to:

  • Listen to presentations from local and national leaders
  • Share their own experiences, knowledge, questions, and results
  • Build connections across the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system to advance civic learning and work
  • Develop next steps for their campuses with feedback from colleagues
  • Increase their awareness of resources and initiatives available through state and national networks.

Participation is open to anyone interested. While we encourage participants to come as part of an institutional team, individual campus representatives are also welcome. To find out more about the schedule, conference fees and accommodations, and to register for the event, please visit: http://www.aascu.org/meetings/adptdcregional14/. We thank Hobsons for generously supporting this event and helping to make this program possible.

#ADPTDC14 Meeting in Review: Forging Civic Pathways for Student Success

By Jen Domagal-Goldman, National Manager, American Democracy Project

Our recent 2014 ADP/TDC National Meeting in Louisville, Ky. brought together a collection of faculty, students, administrators, community partners and representatives from our national sponsor and partner organizations committed to advancing civic learning and engagement through public higher education. Collectively, we considered how to advance civic pathways for student success—by identifying existing pathways and forging new ones. We also contemplated the role of social media in our work and the relationship between journalism and our democracy. Together, we celebrated another year of doing hard and important work by sharing stories and strategies for scaling up and focusing our efforts to drive civic learning and engagement into the core of higher education. We committed ourselves to continuing to work to equip all students with the civic knowledge, skills, experiences and dispositions they need to be successful throughout their careers and as citizens.

Highlights of our time together:

By The Numbers

493 participants, representing 156 different campuses and organizations

  • 67 ADP Campuses
  • 44 TDC Campuses
  • 125 Students
  • 8 Sponsors
  • 27 Partner & Friends Organizations

Social Media Use and #ADPTDC14

ADPTDC14_WordCloud

  • More than 2,500 mentions on both Facebook and Twitter
  • Overall 90% of those posts were positive in sentiment
  • The peak in social media conversation was on Thursday morning during the #Online plenary session
  • Discourse, Dialogue, and Deliberation was the most popular subtopic, accounting for 40% of all social media posts

Selected Tweets:

Program Overview

  • The full program agenda is available for download here (pdf).
  • New this year was a National Community College Organizing day for TDC and a Day of Service at Family Scholar House.
  • After being welcomed to Louisville by Mayor Greg Fischer, national participants considered ways to create and scale-up civic pathways for student success on their campuses and in their communities.

2014 AASCU-178

  • During Friday morning’s “#Online: Democracy Gone Digital” plenary session, Suey Park and The Harry Potter Alliance’s Lauren Bird discussed civic participation and activism via social media.

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  • The Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting’s Mark Shulte spoke about “Untold Stories of the Connected World: Journalism as an Instrument for Citizenship” and shared two thought-provoking examples of video journalism: Sean Gallagher’s The Toxic Price of Leather and Paul Salopek’s Out of Eden trek from Ethiopia to Patagonia.
  • Four awards for civic learning and engagement were presented during Friday’s awards lunch. Read more about the awards and their recipients here.

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2014 AASCU-537

  • In our closing plenary session, faculty and students from ADP and TDC campuses reflected with us about the national meeting and challenged us to further advance the roles of civic learning and engagement on our campuses over the course of the next year.

Comments from National Meeting attendees:

  • “This is THE place to network with civic engagement movers and shakers!”
  • “I was so impressed (again) with the depth and quality of the participation of our student members. They give me great hope for the future.”
  • “The tone of this conference is one of the best I have ever encountered.  The blend of faculty, campus leaders and engaged students is terrific.  There’s also a clear sense that everyone is there with common work in mind.”

2014 AASCU-62

2014 AASCU-566

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We hope to see you in New Orleans, Louisiana June 4-6, 2015, for the next ADP/TDC National Meeting where we will continue our important work of preparing informed, engaged citizens for our democracy.

PowerPoints and other handouts from the meeting are available through the meeting’s QuickMobile mobile app for the next year.

Finally, to see more pictures from the meeting, visit the ADP Facebook Page and AASCU homepage; please send any photos you took to adp@aascu.org so that we can upload them to Facebook.

ADP/TDC Honor Leaders with Awards for Civic Engagement at 2014 National Meeting

AASCU’s American Democracy Project (ADP) and its sister organization The Democracy Commitment honored a team of students and three outstanding leaders in civic engagement earlier this month during their joint national meeting in Louisville, Ky.

2014 ADP/TDC Award Recipients

2014 ADP/TDC Award Recipients

Three ADP awards were presented: The John Saltmarsh Award for Emerging Leaders in Civic Engagement; The William M. Plater Award for Leadership in Civic Engagement; and the inaugural Barbara Burch Award for Faculty Leadership in Civic Engagement. The Democracy Commitment also awarded it’s inaugural award — an award for a team of students.

TDC’s inaugural award, The Democracy Commitment Student Action Award, is given to recognize a student-initiated or -directed project or program that exemplifies the democratic skills and capacities of community college students. The first annual The Democracy Commitment Student Action Award was presented to three students from De Anza College (Calif.). Karla Navarro, Cecelia Ng, and Ashley Schneider were nominated by Cynthia Kaufman for their initiation of and work on the 350 De Anza Divestment Project. These students decided that they wanted Foothill De Anza Community College district to divest from fossil fuels. They conducted research, consulted with faculty mentors, and got unanimous resolutions from the student bodies at both campuses in the district. They then took that to the foundation board and worked with the members to pass a unanimous resolution for full divestment. There are active divestment campaigns on a few hundred campuses nationally, but many of them have stalled out. De Anza was only the eight campus to divest, and was the second state institution and the first community college. The movement really needed a victory at that point, and has since picked up steam, with Stanford’s divestment at the end of spring semester.

This year’s recipient of the John Saltmarsh Award for Emerging Leaders in Civic Engagement, Bethany Fleck, is an assistant professor at Metropolitan State University of Denver (Colo). In addition to teaching courses in human development and psychology, Fleck pioneered two service-learning courses within the psychology department and is at the forefront of the movement to institutionalize service-learning at MSU Denver. The award was created in honor of John Saltmarsh, co-director of the New England Resource Center for Higher Education at the University of Massachusetts Boston, as a tribute to his dedication to nurturing the next generation of civic leaders.

Harold Hellenbrand, this year’s recipient of the William M. Plater Award for Leadership in Civic Engagement, has exemplified the values of this award through his work as provost and vice president of academic affairs at California State University, Northridge. Hellenbrand’s background reflects strengths in planning, K-12 linkages, retention efforts, and a strong commitment to diversity; he has nearly 30 years of experience within the California State University system. The award is named after William M. Plater, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis’ (IUPUI) chief academic officer from 1987 through 2006. During his term at IUPUI, Plater oversaw the development of civic engagement as an integral part of the campus mission and as a defining characteristic of its graduates.

The Barbara Burch Award for Faculty Leadership in Civic Engagement was created this year to honor exemplary faculty leadership in advancing the civic learning and engagement of undergraduate students and advancing the work of AASCU’s American Democracy Project. The inaugural recipient of this award, Gregg Kaufman, is an instructor in the College of Arts and Sciences at Georgia College, where he also coordinates the campus’ American Democracy Project; he also serves on the national ADP implementation committee. The award’s namesake provided extraordinary national leadership in the design, creation and ongoing development of the American Democracy Project.

“We’re so pleased to honor these outstanding individuals who represent the incredible work of civic learning and engagement taking place on our campuses every day,” says George Mehaffy, AASCU’s vice president for academic leadership and change. “The work of the people we recognized in Louisville, and the countless campus faculty members and administrators who also work to prepare the next generation of informed, engaged citizens, will strengthen our country and contribute to a brighter future for us all.”

Introducing the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting

Note: Mark Schulte was a plenary speaker at this month’s 2014 ADP/TDC National Meeting in Louisville, Ky. You can learn more about his organization, The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, and their work in the blog post below.

By Mark Schulte, Education Director, Pulitzer center on Crisis Reporting

In my plenary I use journalism supported by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting to hop to some of our global economy’s rougher spots, sharing stories of people on the front lines of commodities extraction and manufacture.

These include:

  • Larry Price’s still and video images on gold miners in Burkina Faso, published in the Philadelphia Inquirer and PBS NewsHour. I also refer to his work on compression mining in the Philippines, also published in the Inquirer and broadcast on NewsHour.
  • Jason Motlagh’s photographs and article exposing abuses in the Thai shrimp industry, published in the Washington Post.
  • Sean Gallagher’s video project on the toxic price of leather.

I tell these stories not to shame us into a life apart from the bargains we can find online or at discount stores, but to encourage us to reflect on the information we consume and the broader responsibilities that go with citizenship today.

We can’t pretend that our daily existence here in the US can be separated from that of the rest of the world. These commodities are just a few examples of the day-to-day reminders of globalization that surround us.

And as much as we might know about the finished goods we shop for online and in discount stores — especially their prices — most of us know little about the whole story, the one that really tells us who and what pays these hidden costs. We are bombarded by information, yet there is little to help us cultivate a healthy news diet, and much to distract, divide, and misinform.

Why not take charge of our news habits, by slowing down and thinking carefully about the distractions that arise and the patterns that evolve in an ever-quickening digital economy? One journalist has embarked on a walk around the world to show us the value in a more deliberate and reflective pace.

Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Paul Salopek has finished the first of a seven-year trek, retracing the footsteps of our ancestors out of Africa, eastward through the Middle East and Asia, and down the western flank North and South America to finish in Tierra del Fuego. At three miles an hour, he seeks to find the ground truth of the big stories of our time, from mass migrations to food security to climate change.

Follow along on the Out of Eden Walk website and read his blog posts on National Geographic’s site. This remarkable journey invites us not just to learn more about the untold stories of our world through Paul Salopek’s eyes and pen, but to reflect on the value in questioning the pace and direction of our own news consumption, our own place in a changing democracy.


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