Archive for June, 2012

ADP at Fort Hays State University: A Year in Review

By Kelly Nuckolls, Global Leadership Project Student Coordinator, Fort Hays State University
Poster by Matt Niehues, senior graphic design major at FHSU

FHSU ADP_2012 poster

Year-round programs: The following programs occur multiple times throughout our academic school year.

  • Readership: The Readership Program is a sponsorship between the American Democracy Project, the Hays Daily News, and The New York Times. Through this sponsorship, students and faculty were able to receive free copies of these newspapers every business day.
  • Talking Democracy: Hosted by Dr. Chapman Rackaway and Dr. Mark Bannister, this weekly thirty minute Talk Show interviews a member of the community focusing on a current issue in today’s political arena. Co-Sponsored with KFHS.
  • Times Talks: Times Talks are presentations and small group discussions on current national and international issues based on articles from the New York Times.
  • Finding Common Ground: A roundtable discussion where students and faculty can come and discuss a specific current topic in a setting that promotes being open-minded. Some of the roundtables will feature expert panels who will answer questions and give a brief introductory talk on the topic.

eCitizenship

  • Tiger Talk Back:  A different question is posted on a white board on campus and on twitter each week addressing a current global or local issue. Students are able to post their comments to the question on Twitter using the hashtag #tigertalkback.
  • Eye of the Tiger:  A civic journalism site where FHSU students can tell the institution’s day-to-day story in real- time. Eye of the Tiger(http://eyeofthetigerfhsu.wordpress.com) will put a portable video camera into student hands and let them tell the FHSU and Hays story first-hand using Web 2.0 technologies.

Annual Events: The following programs occur each academic school year.

  • Model United Nations:  Students participated in the 52nd Midwest Model United Nations Conference in St. Louis, MO. Students represented delegations from the Russian Federation, Iraq, and Haiti.
  • Public Forums: Open to the public events that feature expertise on a particular topic and then open up to a question & answer session with the featured speaker. Both public forums this year focused on our Student Government Association. The first forum “SGA: What you know ‘bout Fort Hays?,” gave students the opportunity to get to know their student senators, and the second forum was for students to hear the platforms of the two presidential/vice presidential candidates running for the 2012-2013 elections.
  • Poster Competition: Graphic design students created posters displaying their views on current issues and Democracy. The posters were displayed in the Memorial Union and voted on by the student body.
  • Film Screenings:  One screening this year included the documentaryLittle Town of Bethlehem,which is a film created by men of three different faiths that walks the audience through the life of one who has been discriminated against because of cultural difference.
  • Mock Election: FHSU students were able to vote in a mock presidential election. There were able to register to vote and receive educational materials. Students who vote received a free T-shirt. 232 students voted in the Mock Election. President Obama won our Mock Election with 110 votes, or 47 % of the votes. Former Governor Mitt Romney, the Republican Party candidate, followed with 100 votes, 43% of the total. Students had the option to write in a candidate and 14 students, 6% of the total, voted for Ron Paul. The other 8 write-in votes, 4% of the total, were for various candidates.
  • Letter Writing campaigns:  Red Hand Day raised awareness on the issue of child soldiers. Students were able to dip their hands in red paint and stamp a paper. Everyone was asked to sign a petition or write a letter to a senator, representative, president, or UN representatives.
  • Ben Franklin Papers  Using educational activities, put together by a Social Studies Methods class, students were able to learn about Ben Franklin, his inventions, and his contributions to our nation. The event featured a presentation and conversation with Ben Franklin impersonator, Fred Krebs as well as a Boston Tea Party with the Daughters of the American Revolution. This event was held in Forsyth library and the front room of McMindes Hall.
  • Speakers: One of the speakers we brought to our campus this year included  General Vic Braden, who gave the presentation “ An Age of Trial”, giving insight into the military’s role in a chaotic environment in which economic, cultural, political, religious, and social issues are entwined.

For more information on ADP at FHSU, go here.

Felice Nudelman and Tom Ehrlich honored with ADP Spirit of Democracy Awards

By Jen Domagal-Goldman, National Manager, American Democracy Project

ADP's Spirit of Democracy award 2012 honorees

Felice Nudelman and Tom Ehrlich, Spirit of Democracy honorees

The ADP/TDC 2012 national meeting marked the 10th annual meeting of the American Democracy Project. In commemoration of this event, we honored two individuals who played — and continue to play — pivotal roles in the founding and future of ADP.

Felice Nudelman, in her previous role as the Executive Director of Education for The New York Times Company where she was responsible for developing and overseeing education initiatives, including The New York Times Knowledge Network, was a co-partner with George Mehaffy and AASCU in creating the American Democracy Project in 2003. Her involvement in the deliberations and discussions which lead to the founding of ADP was crucial.

Tom Ehrlich was a a Senior Scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching when George Mehaffy and Felice Nudelman called him up to get input and advice for AASCU’s new American Democracy Project. He thought ADP sounded like a “great idea” and was thrilled to help. Tom was the keynote speaker at the first ADP meeting in 2003; he also suggested the ADP campus audits and reading circles — two early ADP implementation strategies on our campuses. Tom and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching were also our national partners in ADP’s Political Engagement Project.

To honor Felice and Tom, we created a “Spirit of Democracy” award, one that will be given infrequently to individuals whom embody ADP’s commitment to prepare the next generation of informed, engaged citizens for our democracy.

“Felice and Tom were not only critical to the creation of the American Democracy Project but valued collaborators and staunch champions of our collective commitment to education for democracy.  I’m thrilled that we could recognize Felice and Tom with Spirit of Democracy awards and I am deeply honored to call them both friends,” said George Mehaffy.

Thank you, Felice and Tom for your commitment to ADP and the important work that we all do together!

eJournal of Public Affairs and the ADP/TDC 2012 National Meeting

eJournal of Public Affairs logo

The eJournal of Public Affairs, a collaboration between Missouri State University and the American Democracy Project, invites presenters from the 2012 ADP/TDC National Meeting to submit a brief description, or abstract for your presentation, consisting of a 100 word or less.

The eJournal would like to include a note in the next issue about the conference and highlight some of the presentations, directing interested viewers to the ADP Wiki.

Please send your brief presentation description/abstract to: ejournalPA@MissouriState.edu and cc Andy Lokie at: AndrewLokie@MissouriState.edu

Emily Janke and Paul Markham receive ADP’s 2012 John Saltmarsh Award for Emerging Leaders in Civic Engagement

By Jen Domagal-Goldman, National Manager, American Democracy Project

In an effort to recognize, support, and encourage the next generation of leaders in the civic engagement movement, the American Democracy Project established an award for emerging leaders in civic engagement in 2011, the John Saltmarsh Award for Emerging Leaders in Civic Engagement.  This annual award was named in John’s honor to recognize a lifetime passion of his, thinking about and preparing the next generation of civic leaders. To learn more about the Saltmarsh Award, visit this website.

2012 Saltmarsh Award Winners with Presenters

(from Left to Right) Jen Domagal-Goldman, Paul Markham, George Mehaffy, Emily Janke, and John Saltmarsh

George Mehaffy, reflecting on the choice of John Saltmarsh as the person for whom the award was named, commented: “John Saltmarsh was the obvious choice for who we would honor in creating this award. John is a great visionary and an inspiring leader. Even more importantly, he has never wavered from a commitment to nurturing the next generation of civic leaders. His consistent question echoes in my mind: ‘Who will do this work when we are gone?’”

John Saltmarsh is the Co-Director of the New England Resource Center for Higher Education (NERCHE) at the University of Massachusetts, Boston as well as a faculty member in the Higher Education Administration Doctoral Program in the Department of Leadership in Education in the College of Education and Human Development. He is the editor, with Matthew Hartley, of the edited volume, “To Serve a larger Purpose”: Engagement for Democracy and the Transformation of Higher Education (Temple, 2011). Royalties from “To Serve a larger Purpose” are being donated in full to fund this award.  I urge you to consider buying the book, not only for its content but also because your purchase of the book will help ensure the sustainability of the award.  You can order the book though Temple University Press website by clicking this weblink.  I also hope you will share this link with colleagues.

A special thank you to William Plater, the Executive Vice Chancellor and Dean of the Faculties Emeritus at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, who generously supported the first two years of this award.

The 2012 Saltmarsh Award recipients are Emily Janke of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and Paul Markham of Western Kentucky University.

John Saltmarsh presented Emily and Paul with their awards at the 2012 ADP/TDC national meeting in San Antonio on June 8. Here are his public comments:

Shortly after I heard form George that he wanted to create an emerging leader award, I found myself at the Highland Folkschool where I cam across a quote from Ella Baker – the civil rights leader, who, after the Greensboro sit-ins, wanted to assist the student activists because she viewed the young, emerging activists as a resource and an asset to the movement – which led to the founding of SNCC, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.
 
The quote reads:
I believe in the right of people to expect those who are older, those who claim to have more experience, to help them grow.

For me, this is the essence of this Award.
 
All of us, in building this movement of public engagement in higher education, have an obligation to help, to mentor, to guide, to encourage, to validate, to push…those who are younger to be the future leaders of this movement.
 
I say this to all of us but I also say it to the recipients today.
 
With this award comes well-deserved recognition; and with it comes an obligation to bring along those who are younger, to build and sustain the movement.
 
It is my pleasure to make this year’s award to two outstanding emerging leaders in civic engagement: Dr. Paul Markam and Dr. Emily Janke.

Paul Markham

Paul Markam is Assistant Professor and Co-Director at the Institute for Citizenship and Social Responsibility at Western Kentucky University. In his nomination, Harry Boyte commented that “Paul demonstrates leadership in building the wider civic engagement movement, shows passion and great skill in advancing the civic learning of undergraduates, has remarkable capacities for collaborative leadership, and continuously mentors new leaders, and acts as an organizational catalyst to change higher education.”

Emily Janke

Emily Janke is Special Assistant for Community Engagement at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. From an undergraduate: “Emily has an enthusiastic attitude toward civic engagement that is contagious.” From a colleague: “She has a knack for collaboration and integration second to none, and a creative flair that makes working with her incredibly fun.” From her Chancellor: “Because of her commitment to excellence and her proven track record as a leader and strategic thinker, I am increasingly looking to Emily as a transformational change agent at UNCG.”
 
Congratulations to Paul and Emily!


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